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Rebecca 1940 123movies

Rebecca 1940 123movies

The shadow of this woman darkened their love.Mar. 23, 1940130 Min.
Your rating: 0
8 1 vote

Synopsis

#123movies #fmovies #putlocker #gomovies #solarmovie #soap2day Watch Full Movie Online Free – A shy lady’s companion, staying in Monte Carlo with her stuffy employer, meets the wealthy Maxim de Winter (Sir Laurence Olivier). She and Max fall in love, marry, and return to Manderley, his large country estate in Cornwall. Max is still troubled by the death of his first wife, Rebecca, in a boating accident the year before. The second Mrs. de Winter (Joan Fontaine) clashes with the housekeeper, Mrs. Danvers (Dame Judith Anderson), and discovers that Rebecca still has a strange hold on everyone at Manderley.
Plot: Story of a young woman who marries a fascinating widower only to find out that she must live in the shadow of his former wife, Rebecca, who died mysteriously several years earlier. The young wife must come to grips with the terrible secret of her handsome, cold husband, Max De Winter. She must also deal with the jealous, obsessed Mrs. Danvers, the housekeeper, who will not accept her as the mistress of the house.
Smart Tags: #widower #castle #shipwreck #costume_party #house_fire #marriage_proposal #haunted_by_the_past #unhappy_marriage #bride #shyness #housekeeper #handwritten_letter #monte_carlo #caught_in_the_rain #house_phone #psychological_abuse #cancer_patient #arson #lgbt #lesbian #servant


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Ratings:

Rebecca 1940 123movies 1 Rebecca 1940 123movies 28.1/10 Votes: 131,280
Rebecca 1940 123movies 3 Rebecca 1940 123movies 2100%
Rebecca 1940 123movies 5 Rebecca 1940 123movies 286/100
Rebecca 1940 123movies 7 Rebecca 1940 123movies 27.9 Votes: 1173 Popularity: 11.875

Reviews:

A good movie and interesting plot but the characters are a little bit exaggerated and the outcome is quite expectable.
Review By: Andres Gomez Rating: 8 Date: 2013-06-28
Absolutely perfect Gothic Thriller that has many imitators but few of equal quality.

With “Rebecca” about to hit the Broadway stage (as a musical!), I thought it was time to write my review of perhaps my favorite Hitchcock film. I recall the first time I saw this on TV almost 30 years ago on the late show, I had set my VCR to tape it, but woke up to start watching a bit of it, and stayed up all night to watch it all. That’s how good a film it is. Daphne Du Maurier’s tale of a shy companion who shocks her employer by winning the most desired wealthy widow in England is gripping, suspenseful, and filled with innuendo. Joan Fontaine never gave a more lovely performance as the awkward bride who leaves her hysterically selfish employer (Florence Bates) to marry the brooding Maxim De Winter (Laurence Olivier) and finds animosity from the darkly dressed Mrs. Danver (Judith Anderson) who resents her intrusion because of her devotion to Maxim’s late wife, Rebecca. The mystery of how Rebecca died and what kind of woman she really was is explored, and with the intrusion of scoundrel George Sanders and some well-meaning advice from Maxim’s toothy sister (Gladys Cooper), the new Mrs. De Winter (her first name is never revealed) finds out more than she bargained for.

If you thought Olivier’s Heathcliff in “Wuthering Heights” was dark and somewhat depressing, wait until you meet his more civilized Maxim. Joan Fontaine’s bride is as far from Merle Oberon’s “wild and sweet” Cathy as you can find, but as far as Gothic tales of brooding men and their lost souls go, the two movies make a perfect double feature. Samuel Goldwyn and David Selznick were Hollywood’s most famous independent producers, so sometimes their careers are compared. They share many of the same players, and in the case of these two films, the same photographer (Gregg Toland). Fontaine and Olivier work well on screen together, even though they apparently did not share a close working relationship. It is, however, the supporting players who are the shining stars.

Anderson’s Mrs. Danvers is a role we’ve already seen on screen (usually played by Gale Sondergaard), but being Anderson’s second film (and first in 7 years), there was a lot of curiosity surrounding her considering her reputation as one of Broadway’s hottest dramatic actresses. Mrs. Danvers isn’t a one dimensional evil housekeeper; You understand her affection for the late Rebecca from the very beginning, and in every movement Anderson makes, you cannot take your eyes off of her. I can’t praise her highly enough. Sanders’ suave villain (who playfully calls Mrs. Danvers “Danny”) is extremely likable and almost equal in stealing away the attention of the leads. Gladys Cooper and Nigel Bruce add on a delightful “pip pip” quality to their eccentric characters, while in her brief time on screen, Florence Bates is hysterically funny, putting out a cigarette in her cold cream, and coolly telling Fontaine how she can never truly be a “great lady”.

Every moment here is a classic movie memory, from the opening narration to Fontaine’s first vision of De Winter, and then, the rainy ride down to where Fontaine sees Mandalay for the first time. The light first quarter darkens the moment we see Anderson pop into view as Mrs. Danvers. A cold pause, then “How Do You Do” reveals the tension, and from there, everything is set. Anderson explodes in two scenes-the first where she finds the hiding Fontaine in Rebecca’s old room, and later, when Fontaine confronts Anderson after discovering her treachery. The film sags just a bit with the discovery of a body that might be Rebecca’s, but that is minor. C. Aubrey Smith is memorable in his small role as Maxim’s attorney. The final shot will live on in your memory, just as Mandalay lived on in the second Mrs. De Winter’s.

While “Rebecca” won Best Film at that year’s Academy Awards, many film historians prefer the message drama “The Grapes of Wrath” as the better film. I find the two rank very close, and also quibble over between the choice of Jane Darwell for Supporting Actress over Anderson’s Mrs. Danvers. A big mistake was not nominating Sanders. A BBC version years later is also very good, a bit more faithful to the novel, and benefits from Diana Rigg as a more approachable Mrs. Danvers and a very diva-ish performance by Faye Dunaway in the Florence Bates role.

Review By: waltzma Rating: 10 Date: 2017-12-14
Haunting Hitchcock.
The only Alfred Hitchcock (Oscar-nominated for directing) film to win the Best Picture Oscar, “Rebecca” is one of those typical films from the amazing director that chills, entertains and puts you on the edge of your seat each time you watch it. Joan Fontaine (Oscar-nominated) has just married the very wealthy Laurence Olivier (also Oscar-nominated), but she is haunted by his mysterious housekeeper (a show-stopping Oscar-nominated performance by Judith Anderson) and the memory of the film’s titled character (Olivier’s late wife). Hitchcock, noted for his subtle sexual under-tones in films spares none of that here as Anderson’s character and the late titled character’s relationship seemed to go much further than employee-employer. Anderson slowly tries to drive Fontaine to insanity and the end she may accomplish her devious goal. Hitchcock’s first real major U.S. debut stunned the Academy and audiences alike and would lead to the coveted Best Picture Oscar. It is not the best film the legendary director ever worked on, but it is still an amazingly good production that works on many cinematic levels. 4.5 out of 5 stars.
Review By: tfrizzell Rating: Date: 2002-07-10
Proof people praise what is expected to be praised
There are two moments of cinematic greatness in this film. 1)The home movie scene, and 2)the scene involving Danvers manipulating Joan Fontaine after the costume ball. But though these memorable instances attempt to cajole us into admiration during the viewing, the overall product beckons us to reexamine our initial wooing. There are a few other moments of atmospheric success, and Fontaine’s initial arrival and exploration of Manderlay and its characters is interesting, but otherwise, the film is often mediocre, and sometimes even poor. Laurence Olivier is very stale and does not exude much of a presence, nor a riveting sense of charm. Fontaine is better, but her character is completely over-the-top. She seems well adjusted and interesting at first, then does nothing but shake and stand with lost eyes for the rest of the film. I know the situation is supposed to bring about such behavior, but it is just too much. The chemistry between the two characters is horrible. Perhaps that is supposed to demonstrate the awkwardness in their relationship. But, then we find de Winter really does love her, and he hates his dead wife. So while his madness translates well, his supposed love for her never does. Not even at the end. And hers for him feels impossible to get our heads around, since he never does anything but be rich and handsome to impress her. I know, I know, those are the dynamics of the relationship, and some of them are more subtle (e.g. de Winter probably goes for her because she seems sexually tame and timidly obsequious), but it still does not feel right in the end. The characters’ actions are too shortsighted for the overall plot.

The film often has no momentum, and drags on forever. The entire opening courtship can be eliminated since it is not efficacious in convincing us of much romance anyway. Then there is the second part, where Fontaine slowly learns the secrets of Manderlay, and though this probably is the best part of the film, it still never feels like it is building to a climax, even though every scene attempts to convey a bit of foreboding intrigue. Instead, it becomes monotonous; precisely because every scene is exactly the same. The end feels like it should approach soon after Danvers diabolical rant. Then there is Olivier’s admission, and it feels like it should come again. But again it doesn’t, and when the ending finally does come, it is of such an enormous magnitude that it feels too brief.

Then there is the story, which I believe has a couple of plot holes, and realistic dilemmas, though I cannot say with absolute certainty. The film has a chance, but not without a reassessment of the script. Another chance at astonishing greatness blown.

Review By: riverspipe Rating: 5 Date: 2005-04-02

Other Information:

Original Title Rebecca
Release Date 1940-03-23
Release Year 1940

Original Language en
Runtime 2 hr 10 min (130 min)
Budget 1288000
Revenue 6000000
Status Released
Rated Approved
Genre Drama, Mystery, Romance
Director Alfred Hitchcock
Writer Daphne Du Maurier, Robert E. Sherwood, Joan Harrison
Actors Laurence Olivier, Joan Fontaine, George Sanders
Country United States
Awards Won 2 Oscars. 7 wins & 10 nominations total
Production Company N/A
Website N/A


Technical Information:

Sound Mix Mono (Western Electric Noiseless Recording)
Aspect Ratio 1.37 : 1
Camera N/A
Laboratory N/A
Film Length (14 reels), 3,540 m (Yugoslavia), 3,600 m (Netherlands)
Negative Format 35 mm
Cinematographic Process Spherical
Printed Film Format 35 mm

Rebecca 1940 123movies
Rebecca 1940 123movies
Rebecca 1940 123movies
Rebecca 1940 123movies
Rebecca 1940 123movies
Original title Rebecca
TMDb Rating 7.9 1,173 votes

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